The Lost Coast

Over Labor Day weekend last September, Stephanie and I backpacked the Lost Coast. Incredibly, it was our first true backpacking trip—you know, the kind where you carry a tent, a sleeping bag, and enough food to stay alive—in five years. Almost immediately after we got back, Stephanie left for France, and I followed a week later. Since then, life got real busy, and I haven’t had the time to post any photos—til now.

Stephanie and Justin at the beginning of the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
It’s always good to capture a before pic (for posterity)

Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area) at the Mattole Trailhead
We started hiking in the fog

Following footsteps in the sand along the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
Following footsteps in the sand

View from the Punta Gorda Lighthouse on the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
View from inside the abandoned Punta Gorda Lighthouse

Trail along the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
Rugged lost coastline

Tight crossing on the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
Neat rock formation; tight crossing

Our campsite on the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
Easily our coolest campsite, ever

Fellow backpackers on the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
Backpackers in the mist

Looking back along the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
Looking back from whence we came

Early evening light on the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
Early evening light; the next day’s hike ahead

Early morning on the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
Accidental black and white (before sunrise)

Bear tracks in the sand on the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
So that’s why we brought the bear can

Footsteps in the sand on the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
Twenty-four miles, mostly in the sand

Stephanie and Justin at the end of the Lost Coast (King Range National Conservation Area)
The obligatory “after”

· Outdoors